1. Want to see how the new TPF works? Click here or you can drop me an email danny@plasterersforum.com
    Dismiss Notice
  2. The Plasterers Forum has now made it even easier to share photos and videos than ever before Click Here To Learn How
    Dismiss Notice
  3. TPF is the biggest plastering community and resource on internet... we are still growing.... we are nearly 10 years old so we are here for a long time yet...
    Dismiss Notice
  4. The Plasterers Forum is growing but we need your help to keep it growing.... Introduce yourself and say hello get involved... they dont bite :-)
    Dismiss Notice
  5. The Plasterers Forum is very busy!! ...25% up on last year!! Be a part of the biggest plastering community
    Dismiss Notice
  6. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
    Dismiss Notice

Striking off

Discussion in 'Fibrous Plastering Discussions' started by GT Cornicer, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    I was wandering what people use when you strike off the cornice like a profile so that the cornice is consistent on the back? As will be easier to stand when drying and will know there are no weak spots when doing small boxing's. There was a guy from Essex who did that and my family all loved fitting his cornice so I want to do it the same. But don't want to scratch the plaster or fibreglass so if anyone does have any info it would be hugely appreciated!
     
  2. Danny

    Danny TPF OWNER

  3. superspread

    superspread Private Member

    A piece of lath
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    I will draw something later and post a picture of what I mean as some cornices that wouldn't work as would be too heavy.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    Sorry been hard at work then falling asleep. Here is a s**t drawing of what I mean. So I have the cornice being a consistent thickness throughout the length.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. superspread

    superspread Private Member

    Yea , a lath like I said earlier
     
  7. JessThePlasterer

    JessThePlasterer Well-Known Member

    Hang in on, can we all take a minute to appreciate the drawing
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  8. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    I will do a drawing later that doesn't look like it was drawn by my 2 year old. And I don't see how a lath is going to make all that smooth on the back? Only the strike off areas, but it wouldn't do all of the back of the profile.
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  9. Stevieo

    Stevieo Active Member


    It's great.

    Is it a house?
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  10. JessThePlasterer

    JessThePlasterer Well-Known Member

    No it's a geographical drawing of the inside of a volcano showing layers of magma and sediment..... duh
     
  11. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    You get it! :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. superspread

    superspread Private Member

    Why do you need all the back of the profile smooth?only the strike off areas touch the wall and ceiling
     
  13. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    This is what I mean as so many times cornice is too heavy in places and then weak in others so this is why I want to make it consistent on the back. Doesn't have to be smooth like the front but close to what ever I run over the back so that I know it's strong in all areas.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. superspread

    superspread Private Member

    But that's why you splash (one of the reasons) to get an even thickness
     
  15. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    In theory,but I buy cornice from some good firm's and weak spots still appear. Don't need to do it for all cornices but Georgian and Victorian were made amazingly by this guy in Essex. So it's something I will do buy just want to know the best way and materials for doing so.
     
  16. superspread

    superspread Private Member

    Use GRG , problem solved (y)
     
  17. mikeadams1985

    mikeadams1985 Private Member

    what you mean is your use to fixing the cheap Chinese shite :D Thats all run off on the back.

    Splash it and it will be fine, but if you did want to do it you need to cut another profile in say plastic that slides over the strike offs

    like below...
     

    Attached Files:

  18. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    Definitely not the Chinese dog s**t. Ha. It's only for Georgians where you can keep the strength but also make it lighter by not having the bulk in the middle. Not for every cornice as that would be pointless. This is the firm that did it for certain cornices.

    http://colesplastermouldings.co.uk
     
  19. mikeadams1985

    mikeadams1985 Private Member

    What you want to do is stick some wads or laps as the southerners say across the back that will strengthen it right up. the georgian cornices do hinge across the thin points without it
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    Did a job today where the cornice was made how I would like to do it. ( So no picture of volcanos)
     

    Attached Files:

    • Like Like x 2
  21. superspread

    superspread Private Member

    Justvseems unecessary , heavy and a waste of material
     
  22. mikeadams1985

    mikeadams1985 Private Member

    Jesus thats some thick cornice, no need for that sort of thickness
    5-10mm thickness and reinforced with wads is plenty of strength
     
  23. GT Cornicer

    GT Cornicer New Member

    Yeah they have done it over the top in material. And of course cuts the profit margin down.
     
  24. superspread

    superspread Private Member

    You'll need 3 people to hold that up :coffe:
     
    • Useful Useful x 1

Share This Page