Any advice would be much appreciated.

#1
Hello Plasterers Forum

Was doing a bit of googling to try and find some answers and stumbled across this site so thought I ask the experts.

My house was built in the 1920s/30s (cavity walls) and I want to start getting some rooms skimmed. I've had 2 plasterers out to look at it and got 2 different opinions. First one was happy to crack on and skim over existing painted walls with multifinish and the 2nd one seemed to suggest you shouldn't use multifinish because there is likely to be lime in the existing plaster. My previous 1930s house was skimmed throughout with multifinish with no mention of the lime thing .

Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks
Tom
 

Cockney1

Well-Known Member
#9
Hello Plasterers Forum

Was doing a bit of googling to try and find some answers and stumbled across this site so thought I ask the experts.

My house was built in the 1920s/30s (cavity walls) and I want to start getting some rooms skimmed. I've had 2 plasterers out to look at it and got 2 different opinions. First one was happy to crack on and skim over existing painted walls with multifinish and the 2nd one seemed to suggest you shouldn't use multifinish because there is likely to be lime in the existing plaster. My previous 1930s house was skimmed throughout with multifinish with no mention of the lime thing .

Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks
Tom
So what material did the second pussy.... oops sorry plasterer want to use?
 
#10
Thanks to everyone that's responded. The other guy was suggesting that the old 1930s plaster might expand and contract and the multifinish won't (if I have understood correctly). He was on about taking back to brick and starting again or skimming with something called limelight, which having looked at is about 6 times the price of normal plaster. Hence that's why I thought I'd ask the question .
Thanks
 

Cockney1

Well-Known Member
#11
His other plasterer
Thanks to everyone that's responded. The other guy was suggesting that the old 1930s plaster might expand and contract and the multifinish won't (if I have understood correctly). He was on about taking back to brick and starting again or skimming with something called limelight, which having looked at is about 6 times the price of normal plaster. Hence that's why I thought I'd ask the question .
Thanks
theiving b*****d!!
 

Vincey

Private Member
#12
Be worth considering proofshield too tbf going back to brick ,
It’s a better job all round going back to brick
 
#13
Most of these jobs start with the wife saying the room could do with a freshen up of paint. Then before you know it Pete has got the timbers and bricks showing and the husbands turned to drink lol! :loco::love:
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
#14
Most of these jobs start with the wife saying the room could do with a freshen up of paint. Then before you know it Pete has got the timbers and bricks showing and the husbands turned to drink lol! :loco::love:
Did that a while back at my mate's house. She wanted to decorate and took a bit of plaster off the wall.

I told her I'd have to strip out the bad plaster.....'cept that turned out to be her whole bedroom back to the stone, the ceiling had to come down and the window .....what do you call them boards that people put into reveals sometimes?...anyway, them out....then the electrics were f**k*d so had to get a sparky for them.....

LOL, she thought it was gonna be a half day's patching.
 
#15
Personally I would just skim over, providing the original is sound. Millions of houses in U.K. have been done this way with very little to no problems. Technically he may be right, but if everything was done according to that principle nothing would ever be done or affordable. If ceilings not sound then overboard, save so much time and mess, also adds to insulation, sound proofing and fire ratting.