A GUIDE TO FLOATING WALLS

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theclemo

Private Member
I find I have to rule off hardwall again after it pulls in a bit.
Yes I do that to. I just find that hardwall don't rule as flat as sand and cement. And floating the hardwall I find the float just glides over it.
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
Yes I do that to. I just find that hardwall don't rule as flat as sand and cement. And floating the hardwall I find the float just glides over it.
if high suction we 2 coat hardwall, first coat kills suction, lay on 2nd coat and rule in, we use a featheredge rule, a lot of plasterers use a darby.
if low suction, may put the room on before i start to rule, then check to make sure it has not slumped.
we leave the hardwall pull in, then with a light spray of water devil up with a diamond float.
 

Cornelius

Well-Known Member
if high suction we 2 coat hardwall, first coat kills suction, lay on 2nd coat and rule in, we use a featheredge rule, a lot of plasterers use a darby.
if low suction, may put the room on before i start to rule, then check to make sure it has not slumped.
we leave the hardwall pull in, then with a light spray of water devil up with a diamond float.
What size darby? Surely not a standard 1.2, I've got a 1.8, 2.0 and a 2.4 for floating and normal 1.2 for external rendering.
 
A very well described guide on dot / screed. For what it's worth I still use this method to this day when the walls have to be within the millimetre.

For accurate work this method when done right can not be beaten. I don't often use it these days due to time constraints but for high class work I believe this method can not be beaten.

And fair play to the poster for an accurate description, proper text book.
 

Stewie03

New Member
I still use the same old fashioned method when I was an apprentice the box screed method i put my vertical and horizontal screeds on first level them off then fill in the middle and level that off job done wait for it to pull in a bit and give it a float up ready for skimming
 
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