Browning on thermalite .

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beader

Private Member
Been to look at a few jobs lately where the browning is shelling off the block work . Houses built around the late 70's early 80's. any one else finding this . Is it going to become a concern going forward for houses that were done this way ?
 

algeeman

It’s A Boy
Been to look at a few jobs lately where the browning is shelling off the block work . Houses built around the late 70's early 80's. any one else finding this . Is it going to become a concern going forward for houses that were done this way ?
we used to soak the thermalites first.suction fuuckkng horrible.
especially in summer
 

Djr

Well-Known Member
Been to look at a few jobs lately where the browning is shelling off the block work . Houses built around the late 70's early 80's. any one else finding this . Is it going to become a concern going forward for houses that were done this way ?
Seen loads of it falling off down to thermalite block . There the worst block ever
 

bof

Well-Known Member
No . People don't like being told that there re'skim job is in fact a complete re'plaster . But that's up to them .
Not just browning , seen most shell of therms , i rake out some of the mortar joints for dab but turn down floating on them
 

hollybank

Private Member
If your gunna float it then traditional sand and cement onto the block would be better than a bg based powder plaster like hardwall buy either way it's hard to control suction haye thermalite
Thermalites dont like sand and cement either.
 

Djr

Well-Known Member
It's a c**t to hack drywall off them things . Urrrgh happy memories of refurbs
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
Not just browning , seen most shell of therms , i rake out some of the mortar joints for dab but turn down floating on them
40 years is long enough these days and you should be long gone before it fails
 

bof

Well-Known Member
40 years is long enough these days and you should be long gone before it fails
Not the point , therms have too high an expansion rate and are too soft , if I had to float I would gouge physical fixings and wet PVA , as I said before , customer will have to find another spread , just turned down a new build 4 bed as they wanted float hardwall and wouldn't go for dab.
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
Not the point , therms have too high an expansion rate and are too soft , if I had to float I would gouge physical fixings and wet PVA , as I said before , customer will have to find another spread , just turned down a new build 4 bed as they wanted float hardwall and wouldn't go for dab.
someone will do the work and it will be fine and you can carry on with your crusade while they count the money.
 
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Reactions: bof

essexandy

The Lake Governor
I have f&s literally hundreds of houses built from Thermalite, Durox and Celcon blocks without any issues whatsoever.
The problem with Browning was that no one ever seemed to get the high suction version. The standard Browning never really seemed to adhere well to the blocks.
 

beader

Private Member
Mixing the b*****d stuff in a metal bath with a shovel and rake was bad enough.
Two bags at a time lol. Wish BG would make a backing plaster with the same properties as sand and cement but light weight and with a good shelf life and cheaper than the damp work backing plasters .
 

Donzo

Well-Known Member
Lucky to be still standing after 40 years on the trowel
They are guys on here doing it longer than me, float and set for years is a body buster. Leave that to the guys who want punishment. Done loads of it. Never enjoyed it.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Two bags at a time lol. Wish BG would make a backing plaster with the same properties as sand and cement but light weight and with a good shelf life and cheaper than the damp work backing plasters .
I suggested just this to a BG rep. about ten years ago. The same time that I suggested they sell little sachets to add to plaster to either speed it up or slow it down.
He said that BG wanted to push things back towards f&s and that my suggestion was a good one. I told him it'd never happen due to a lack of skill in the industry.
 

beader

Private Member
Where i live i can not get any Hardwall . no one will stock it due to the fact it goes out of date and no one wants it because i guess they cant float or just prefer dot and dab . I can still get bonding but that is just as rubbish for floating full walls IMO but ok for patching and sorting bad areas before re'skims . Sand and cement will always be the best material for wet plastering in my opinion but is not alway's a viable option due to curing times and background etc .
 

jamesthefirst

Private Member
Two bags at a time lol. Wish BG would make a backing plaster with the same properties as sand and cement but light weight and with a good shelf life and cheaper than the damp work backing plasters .
the Dri coat was good stuff but way too expensive, mapei GPR is good and at a good price from p1stop but double the price elsewhere.
 
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